My musings on 22 October 2012

Here are my recent musings on patterns and connections In Nature.

This series of blog posts contains the most recent  Internet articles that interest me. They are sources for my musings and my research which I am happy to share with you.  If you find any of the articles interesting, I hope that you will offer your comments at the end of the list.

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The ecological impact of a border wall

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Scientist Takes First-Ever Photo of Rare Bird, Then Kills It in the Name of Science. This was much like another researcher, Donal Rush Currey who in 1964 climbed up into the High Sierra Nevada Mountains of California and took a Chainsaw to the oldest known living Bristlecone Pine (named the Prometheus tree) tree just to count the rings to see how old it was.

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Mesmerizing examples of animal and human collective behavior.

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Scientist Elizabeth Hadly has been studying biodiversity in Yellowstone National Park for 30 years. Accompanied by biologist Sean Carroll, she demonstrates different ways in which climate change is impacting the park’s ecosystems. Bark beetles are surviving the winter at higher elevations and killing a large number of white-bark pine trees, disrupting the food web that includes squirrels and grizzly bears. Climate change is also causing ponds to dry up, reducing the pond habitat and decimating the local amphibian population. Although the park provides protected environments for animals, it is not immune from global threats like climate change.

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How Humans Save Nature. A different perspective. What do you think?

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Back To School : Unlearning Nine Environmental Myths. Peter Kareiva’s List.

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A written summary of a very interesting lecture about food webs given by Jennifer Dunne at Santa Fe Institute. She portrays a hidden order in ecosystems using the studies of ecology and network theory.

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A ray of hope. Fewer than 100 vaquitas—an elusive porpoise found only in the Sea of Cortez—are left on Earth. But there are new recent sightings of this rare marine mammal.

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A very informative one page PDF summary by the National Park Service about the effects of human made poisons (like rat poison) on local wildlife. How these poisons work themselves up the food chain.

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Another informative web page by the National Park Service on avoiding unintentional poisoning of wildlife

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My name is Bill Graham. As a Marine Biologist who has worked in the US and Mexico for 30 years, I am a student of Nature, a teacher, a researcher, and a nature photographer. Through my work, I have acquired an ever growing passion for how everything in Nature is connected. Today, I travel extensively contemplating about, writing about, and photographing Nature’s connections. I also work with conservation projects in the USA and Mexico and mentor talented youth.

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