My musings on 12 September 2015

Here are my recent musings on patterns and connections In Nature.

This series of blog postings contains the most recent  Internet articles that interest me. They are sources for my musings and my research which I am happy to share with you.  If you find any of the articles interesting, I hope that you will offer your comments at the end of the list.

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Evidence that Earth’s first mass extinction was caused by critters not catastrophe

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Whether you believe that climate change is caused by mankind or by other means, this EPA web page is a wonderfully concise description of the impact that climate change has on ecosystems.

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Which method of raising cows is the most climate-friendly?

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Now That Yellowstone Killed Blaze Bear, What About Her Cubs?

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Do Killer Grizzlies Deserve Death?

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What It Takes to Kill a Grizzly Bear

Yellowstone grizzly bears face the two greatest threats to their survival in our lifetime: global warming and the U.S. government. Between them they could wipe the bears out. A great article by Doug Peacock.

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Why we should eat crickets instead of cows

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Humans are the worst predators on the planet

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One of the issues that sometimes get overlooked when it comes to conservation biology, is that nothing in nature lives in a vacuum – each species is inextricably linked to a network of other species through a series of ecological interactions, and usually they cannot exist without them. That is something to keep in mind for people who think that if a species was to go extinct, then we can simply “resurrect” them through cloning (that is if we even have the technology to be able to do that.”

This quote is KEY to what my blog site is all about. It comes from a Google+ post on fungi and orchids in old-growth forests. Old-growth forests are great testaments to the need for connectivity in Nature that so many humans ignore.

The actual article is here.

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What is an old-growth forest? 

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From the State of Minnesota. A nice web site on old-growth forests.

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My name is Bill Graham. As a Marine Biologist who has worked in the US and Mexico for 30 years, I am a student of Nature, a teacher, a researcher, and a nature photographer. Through my work, I have acquired an ever growing passion for how everything in Nature is connected. Today, I travel extensively contemplating about, writing about, and photographing Nature’s connections. I also work with conservation projects in the USA and Mexico and mentor talented youth.

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