My latest musings on 31 January 2015

Hello To All My Loyal Readers:

On alternate weeks, I share the URLs to some articles by others that I have found interesting. Here is a list of some recent articles that I’ve read.

I hope that you will offer your comments at the end of this list. But first, consider this cartoon:

Kids

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How does eating meat impact your water footprint? it requires 1,799 gallons of water to produce one pound of meat. One steer consumes over one million gallons of water over its short lifetime.

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Why you need to care about wildlife conservation? A great article that emphasizes a consciousness for connections in Nature.

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OOur Harsh Freezing Weather Produces Good News From Nature 

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Obedient killer whales doing heroic leaps and splashing patrons with cold tank water are a cash cow for SeaWorld. The spectacle is such a crowd-pleaser that there seems little reason to imagine that these majestic mammals—who appear to bask in the glow of their own performance—are so distressed that they’d attack humans. All that changed in 2010, when a 12,000-pound killer whale named Tilikum dragged his trainer by her hair and drowned her in front of an Orlando audience. The 2013 documentary, “Blackfish”, makes the case that Tilikum attacked Brancheau because of mounting frustration induced by captivity. David Kirby, the author of “Death at SeaWorld: Shamu and the Dark Side of Killer Whales in Captivity,” believes that “Blackfish’s” interpretation of Brancheau’s death is right on the mark. See http://james-mcwilliams.com/?p=4848

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Many people still aren’t comfortable admitting they’re animals. And this supremacist attitude is reflected in everything they do in regard to our fellow species. Anyone who has been following the wolf issue since gray wolves were removed from the Endangered Species List in a handful of backward states has certainly noticed a rapid backslide pertaining to how wolves are perceived, treated and “managed” by those bent on dragging us back to the dark ages for animals—the Nineteenth Century—when concepts like bounties, culls and contest huntgs were commonplace. Hunters and ranchers in the tri-state area surrounding Yellowstone National Park, as well as in the Great Lakes region, are doing everything they can to resurrect the gory glory days of the 1800s, and wolves are paying the ultimate price. See:

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There is more money in looking at bears than there is in shooting them — 12 times more to be exact, according to a new study.

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A Recent Study Shows That Large Carnivore Decline Puts Humans At Risk.

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A sad commentary on the invasion of mankind into Nature without respect for other creatures.

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A short video that does a great job in describing biodiversity

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Conservation’s blind spot: The case for conflict transformation in wildlife conservation

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The Nature Conservancy lists some very interesting and profound essays by conservation leaders. One of these essays about large predators listed previously in this post comes from that list.

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Wetlands and Biodiversity

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12 Wins For Wildlife in 2014

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Here is some more great footage, from a drone, of humpback whales teaming up to create a bubble net and feeding on a fish school. In my view, proof that creatures, other than ourselves, are intelligent.

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In my view, our hope for saving Nature on our planet lies with our youth. This wonderful clip is about a conservation professor and the youth he serves. Much of what he says I have had the joy of experiencing.

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280 acres bought for Highway 17 mountain lion tunnel

My name is Bill Graham. As a Marine Biologist who has worked in the US and Mexico for 30 years, I am a student of Nature, a teacher, a researcher, and a nature photographer. Through my work, I have acquired an ever growing passion for how everything in Nature is connected. Today, I travel extensively contemplating about, writing about, and photographing Nature’s connections. I also work with conservation projects in the USA and Mexico and mentor talented youth.

2 Responses to “My latest musings on 31 January 2015”

  1. Annette Felix says:

    I might have to “borrow” the cartoon and share it! Also, love to watch whales (and other animals) working together. Thanks for your thoughtful compilation.

  2. You are very welcome Annette. You are welcome to use anything that is of interest to you.

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